966
05 Jan 12 at 3 pm

filmcolours:

fairest:

from Red Desert. Antonioni once said of a Mark Rothko painting, “It’s painted anxiety.”

http://not-critical.com/2010/08/red-desert/

(via weerasethakul)

filmcolours:

fairest:

from Red Desert. Antonioni once said of a Mark Rothko painting, “It’s painted anxiety.”

http://not-critical.com/2010/08/red-desert/
 471
07 Oct 11 at 9 pm

(Source: fake-patois, via ontheqtrain)

tags: marvin gaye 
 1628
05 Oct 11 at 11 am

vistavision:

L’Éclipse du Soleil en Pleine Lune | 1907

(Source: , via praise-of-folly)

vistavision:

L’Éclipse du Soleil en Pleine Lune | 1907
 115
04 Oct 11 at 10 pm

justnewromantic:

Josephine Baker, “La Sirène des Tropiques

 117
04 Oct 11 at 5 pm

european-son:

Le Plaisir (1952), by Max Ophuls

(via unvraibordel)

tags: message 
european-son:

 
Le Plaisir (1952), by Max Ophuls
 4
09 Sep 11 at 9 pm

Jean Harlow

Jean Harlow
 12
06 Sep 11 at 10 pm

There is a time in every film critic’s life when he thinks that Billy Wilder is more profound than John Ford, and that nastiness if more profound than nobility. However, the acquiring of moral wisdom comes with mortal awareness, and vice begins paying back all its youthful debts to virtue. At such a moment, Ophuls becomes more profound than Schnitzler and De Maupassant, and Madame de becomes infinitely more tragic than The Bicycle Thief. By showing man in his direst material straits, De Sica and Zavattini imply a solution to his problems. Ophuls offers no such comforting consolation. His elegant characters lack nothing and lose everything. There is no escape from the trap of time. Not even the deepest and sincerest love can deter the now from its rendezvous with the then, and no amount of self-sacrifice can prevent desire from becoming embalmed in memory. “Quelle heure est-il?” ask the characters in La Ronde, but it is always too late, and the moment has always passed.

- Andrew Sarris, The American Cinema: Directors and Directions 1929-1968

(Source: bookloop)


There is a time in every film critic’s life when he thinks that Billy Wilder is more profound than John Ford, and that nastiness if more profound than nobility. However, the acquiring of moral wisdom comes with mortal awareness, and vice begins paying back all its youthful debts to virtue. At such a moment, Ophuls becomes more profound than Schnitzler and De Maupassant, and Madame de becomes infinitely more tragic than The Bicycle Thief. By showing man in his direst material straits, De Sica and Zavattini imply a solution to his problems. Ophuls offers no such comforting consolation. His elegant characters lack nothing and lose everything. There is no escape from the trap of time. Not even the deepest and sincerest love can deter the now from its rendezvous with the then, and no amount of self-sacrifice can prevent desire from becoming embalmed in memory. “Quelle heure est-il?” ask the characters in La Ronde, but it is always too late, and the moment has always passed.
- Andrew Sarris, The American Cinema: Directors and Directions 1929-1968